Information collection and analysis for emergency aid to the warzone

Delivering healthcare to hundreds of thousands of displaced people in the hostile jungle is never easy. With continuous SPDC patrols looking for civilians to enslave or shoot-on-sight and continuous road developments to increase trade for military profit, the struggle and risk amounts to more than most could imagine, not just for the medics supplying healthcare but also for the patients, who often have to travel long distances risking their lives to receive medicine.

In order to monitor these issues and find sustainable solutions, WIN has helped community health workers develop a detailed information collection system to identify the most common hindrances to these people and ways to get around them. During the pilot phase, this survey has already covered hundreds of villagers, documenting the issues that stop them accessing healthcare.

This month 4 medics came out of the jungle to receive survey training so that they can pass their skills on to clinics across Karen State. By December this year, we plan to have documentation covering 4 key regions affected by war that can be used first and foremost to improve provision of healthcare but may also be able to help gain international support.

When people think of human rights, the most violent ones usually come to mind, but in fact the right to travel is a fundamental human right that few governments or cultures would argue was not crucial to living a stable peaceful life. While in Karen State, violence is also a horrible reality, the effects on the everyday lives of generations of Karen citizens gains little attention despite its severity. WIN is dedicated to enabling war victims in Burma to building stable living environments for their families so programmes like this are crucial to developing an understanding of what the real issues are that people face.

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